Assembly Language

In computer programming, assembly language (or assembler language), often abbreviated asm, is any low-level programming language in which there is a very strong correspondence between the instructions in the language and the architecture’s machine code instructions. Because assembly depends on the machine code instructions, every assembler has its own assembly language which is designed for exactly one specific computer architecture. Assembly language may also be called symbolic machine code.

Assembly code is converted into executable machine code by a utility program referred to as an assembler. The conversion process is referred to as assembly, as in assembling the source code. Assembly language usually has one statement per machine instruction (1:1), but comments and statements that are assembler directives, macros, and symbolic labels of program and memory locations are often also supported.